Friday, 10 January 2014

Video Tutorial - Making a floor lamp (Part 1)

This is my first attempt at making a video tutorial.

O~o

So apologies in advance for:
- the fact that I sound nervous...because I was
- that it's in English with no subtitles. I hope anyone who doesn't understand English but wants to follow the tutorial can get the gist of it by watching what I'm doing
- that my accent is so strong and I am no good at putting on a 'phone voice'

Apart from that, I hope you enjoy the first part of the making of a dollhouse scale floor lamp. As with all of my tutorials, this is how I make miniatures but it isn't necessarily the only way to make them. 

If you want to try this tutorial, you will need:

Soldering iron
Solder
Dollhouse wire
Surface mounted LED (3volts, any colour you wish)
3 volt coin battery
Flux 
Paint brush
Craft Knife
Wire snips
Double sided sticky tape

Enjoy!



Click on the icon on the right, at the bottom to make the screen larger









40 comments:

  1. WOW! You did a great job making that tutorial!!! It was very easy to see and understand. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Catherine. I really appreciate you saying that. I didn't know if it would help anyone, or if they could understand my accent =0/

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. Thank you Gandmommy. It is a simple process but I think people worry because it is electronics. It just takes a bit of patience and practice =0)

      Delete
  3. I agree. I thought I could never do this, but your tutorial convinced me otherwise! Thank you so much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course you can do it Suzy. When you think of the tiny things you handle in miniatures, soldering LEDS is just the same. I hope you give it a try in your own projects =0)

      Delete
  4. Dear Carol Thank you! Finally I could hear your voice and feel a bit more familiar.....
    Could you make the window a bit larger for us short sighted?
    Thank you. Cannot wait for part two.
    Neomi

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello my Dear Neomi. If you click on the icon at the bottom right of the video (it looks like a broken box symbol), the video will open up to the size of your screen =0)

      Delete
  5. I love your accent so much! thanks for this great video!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Oese. I'm glad that you think I sound okay =0D

      Delete
  6. Well done you! I thought that was very clear and easy to follow. Makes me think even I could do it, although I don't know if dad would lend me his soldering iron... :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you and I hope you had a fab Birthday. Man, you're getting old ha-ha ;0P

      Delete
    2. I'm younger than you are... Muhahaha.... And it's not till next friday.... :-)

      Delete
    3. Man my memory is crap. Well Happy Birthday for Friday and you're right, you still have youth on your side...me, I'm heading for a pension book haha

      Delete
  7. Yeah! Finally a clear tutorial! I get this, I can make this! I have got none of the tools nor materials, but at least, now I know what to get and what to do with it! Your accent is perfect and so is your voice. Be glad you cannot put on a phone voice, you might attract a totally different audience ;-)
    Thanks heaps!!
    Veronique

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha-ha, Thank you Veronique. I don't think my phone voice would attract that sort of audience huh =0D

      Delete
  8. A very clear and easy to understand tutorial (and I am Dutch!) Hopefully one of these days I will be brave enough to try my hand at soldering.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you sweets. I'm over the moon that it's clear enough to understand. Saying that, my friend Josephine is Dutch and speaks much better English than me =0)

      Delete
  9. Hi Pepper! Great tutorial, easily understandable. I'm a total moron when it comes to things like this so I actually learned quite a lot!
    Love your accent BTW! (I'm from Shropshire, we don't have an accent...)
    I look forward to the next tutorial.
    Kind regards, Brian.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey there Brian. I bet you would sound very posh next to me =0D

      Delete
  10. That was GREAT Pepper! Thank you so much, I always can learn and understand thing so much better when I SEE them done than when I just read it. Brilliant xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Elbey. I am the same. I learn much better watching someone doing something and then copying their technique =0)

      Delete
  11. Oh! This was a fantastic tutorial, Pepper! You did a wonderful job and you sound brilliant. There was no problem with your accent at all, so don't worry about that. We all just love that you make marvelous minis!! Thank you for taking the time (and guts) to make and post this tutorial! Now I have to add more to my shopping list.... :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much Lyssa. That's really kind of you to say x

      Delete
  12. This is a great tutorial,I find it really useful and clear (your accent is perfect for me too :-). Thank you so much Pepper.
    Hugs

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Mara, I'm very happy that you found it useful =0)

      Delete
  13. Hi Pepper! I also learn much better watching someone doing something and this clear tutorial did the same for me, so I thank YOU! I have a very old soldering iron (I guess he is antique by now ;)), and it is much too big for this delicate work. So I am thinking about saving up some money to buy me a new one......;).
    I enjoyed reading the comments (from both sides) about your voice :D!! Your voice is okay, Pepper, don't worry, you have never heard mine ;)!
    Have a great week(end), Ilona

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi IIona. Maybe you could buy a smaller tip to suit your soldering iron? =0/ Maybe we'll hear your voice one day?? Maybe a tutorial from you to show us how you make your fabulous miniatures? =0D

      Delete
  14. I have had a soldering iron on my eBay wish list for months but have had no idea what else I'd need to solder or how to do it. Thank you for making it so clear and straight forward!

    (PS: Love you accent especially as my linguistics training makes me interested in different pronunciations of words and ways of using phrases)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha-ha. That makes me more nervous. So what does analysing the way I speak tell you...common-as-muck northerner with a habit of going 'Um' and 'Er' when I get stuck =0P

      XX

      Delete
    2. Oh dear, don't get nervous: it was only about six months' study, 20 years ago.

      The main difference I noticed between my accent and yours is that words I say as a single syllable, you say as two ('take' vs 'ta-ek', 'hold' vs 'ho-eld') and 'mischief' (I say 'mizchif', your say 'miss-chief') I notice similar with a friend here who pronounces 'necklace' as 'neck-lace' where as I pronounce it 'necklis'

      Perhaps anitpodeans are lazy speakers?

      Delete
    3. That's actually very interesting. We're known for shortening words in colloquial tongue (i.e. nothing to nowt, haven't got any to havnae). Almost as if I was trying to get my point across by enunciating each part of the word. Though I speak very fast in 'non tutorial' conversation and it's akin to the Scottish lilt. (not surprising being less than 20 miles from the border) Hmm, interesting indeed!

      Delete
  15. Hello Pepper,
    What a great tutorial. Thank you so much for taking the time to make it...your instructions are great!
    Big hug,
    Giac

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Giac, that's really nice of you to say X

      Delete
  16. Thank you so much for the great tutorial, Carol! I've finally got my inspiration back and have been working like crazy at my 1930s house for the past week or so. The holes are drilled into the kitchen ceiling and your tutorial has come just in time, as I'm about to put the LEDs you've sent to me, in. I've also finally started to use the Proxxon saw. I can't believe I've been cutting stuff by hand for such a long time. Things come out so much neater, with a lot less blood and sweat involved... :-) Thanks again for your great pressies and inspiration!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey sweets, no problem. I'm pleased your getting some mini time...for purely selfish reasons mind. I miss you posts and cool scenes. Looking forward to seeing the progress on the 1930's house =0)

      Delete
  17. I just went back to watch your tutorial again...you did a perfect job explaining everything. Just one question...if you use a higher volt LED do you have to use a resistor? I've been watching several videos on LED's and they all use resistors.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi M4M, technically speaking you should use a resistor. I'm sure a lot of electricians would shake their head because I haven't. HOWEVER, because I'm using batteries and not putting them on mains electricity (through a transformer) I'm assuming that the voltage of the battery is consistant and that the small resistance already in the LED will protect it. If, for example, there was a surge of voltage from the battery because they are not classed as a stable power source, and it peaked over 3V (which is the limit of the LED's I used), then the LED would likely die. To be absolutely safe, work out the resistor size you need and add it to the circuit. I've never had a LED burn out but I've never put batteries onto LEDs with higher voltages. Clear as mud? =0/

      Delete